Filed under Humour

The Shipwreck of The Grosvenor 4 August 1782

The Shipwreck of The Grosvenor 4 August 1782

The East India Company’s Grosvenor was a three-masted, square-rigged, frigate-built vessel. She was built by Wells of Deptford and set off on her maiden voyage to India in 1770. Twelve years later, on her fourth and last voyage from Madras to England, she plowed straight into the African continent in the early hours of a stormy, misty morning. She … Continue reading

Victorian Cosmetics 2 – More Recipes for Unguents

Victorian Cosmetics 2 – More Recipes for Unguents

I’m adding one more recipe for a Victorian unguent from the wonderful Ladies’ Book of Etiquette and Manual of Politeness written in 1875 by Florence Hartley. I’m not sure that this one will be a great money spinner for me in terms of my post-retrenchment recovery plan, but the stories that come with it are fascinating – … Continue reading

Retrenchee Reads a Book of Etiquette

Retrenchee Reads a Book of Etiquette

I was retrenched this week. It’s quite a thing to say that out aloud. I don’t like it; it sounds dirty – stench, retrench. I prefer to think of myself as a retrenchee. It sounds exciting and revolutionary. Retrenchee and Trotsky met Frida and Diego for tequila in the smokey room. Yes, better. But, alas, I am not … Continue reading

Historic Fashion Faux Pas

Historic Fashion Faux Pas

I am reading Catharine Arnold’s wonderful City of Sin: London and it’s Vices. The cover features a plate of William Hogarth’s Rake’s Progress. Bearing in mind that Hogarth was a satirist, one should perhaps take his picture with a pinch of salt but I was transfixed and thoroughly amused by the sheer number of fashionable beauty … Continue reading

Nose Jobs in the 19th Century

Nose Jobs in the 19th Century

“The science of the nose has reached such perfection that it is now possible to modify or change the nose” ~Baroness Staffe,  My Lady’s Dressing Room 1892 This article follows on from a previous post in which I had promised to look into early rhinoplasty as described in My Lady’s Dressing Room. Disappointingly, Baroness Staff’s entry was slim. Her … Continue reading

A Polar Bear in my Victorian Bathroom

A Polar Bear in my Victorian Bathroom

“At the opposite side of the room is placed a couch covered with the skin of a Polar bear, whereon, clad in a luxurious peignoir, one reposes after the fatigues of the bath and the douche. “ ~The Lady’s Dressing Room, by Baroness Staffe We are renovating our characterless 1970s bathroom. We have only the … Continue reading