Filed under South African History

The Bez Valley Ghost House

The Bez Valley Ghost House

I have written a blog! I have not fallen off the face of the earth, although I have fallen down the rabbit hole. If you have forgotten in the very long time since my last blog here, I have another, for which I dress up like a bit of a fool for Rubbish Day Wednesdays. … Continue reading

Prostitutes, Charles Dickens and Heritage Day

Prostitutes, Charles Dickens and Heritage Day

Today in South Africa, we are on holiday. It is a public holiday, Heritage Day. Originally called Shaka Day and only celebrated in Kwazulu Natal, 24 September commemorated the life of mighty King of the Zulus, King Shaka. Shaka was a brutal, fiercely intelligent, militant Zulu chief who conquered disparate small tribes and united the Zulu nation. He … Continue reading

Granny was a go-go dancer (almost)

Granny was a go-go dancer (almost)

I’m back! I have been a very bad blogger for the past three weeks. There are two reasons for this: 1) I have been living a pre-Industrial Revolution life. I bought myself a bustle dress and a proper, torturously beautiful corset and I spend my days assembling my wares. My arms are so tired by the end of … Continue reading

The Shipwreck of The Grosvenor 4 August 1782

The Shipwreck of The Grosvenor 4 August 1782

The East India Company’s Grosvenor was a three-masted, square-rigged, frigate-built vessel. She was built by Wells of Deptford and set off on her maiden voyage to India in 1770. Twelve years later, on her fourth and last voyage from Madras to England, she plowed straight into the African continent in the early hours of a stormy, misty morning. She … Continue reading

South African Ghost Stories: Jan Smuts’ House

South African Ghost Stories: Jan Smuts’ House

It is difficult to write a short story about a ghost that involves the life of Jan Smuts, the 2nd Anglo/Boer War, concentration camps, hidden treasure, the Great War, WWII, a Greek princess, Prime Ministers, pickles, tough Boer chicks and a spot that I just love to visit. I will continue to remind myself throughout, however, that I’m … Continue reading

Sharpeville Massacre 21 March 1960

Sharpeville Massacre 21 March 1960

On the 21st March 1960 a large group of black South African protestors marched on the Sharpeville police station. They were protesting the Apartheid government’s pass laws which required every black person over the age of 16 to carry a pass, to be presented to the police on demand. Tension at the protest escalated as protestors began … Continue reading